What is a qualude? I’m watching Scarface..


Q:and they said something about qualudes, what are they?
More Answers to “What is a qualude? I’m watching Scarface..
Quaalude is a trademark for a drug called Methaqualone, it’s a sedative
it was a popular downer/barbituate in the 60″s and 70″s usually had “712” stamped on it.[ i think that was it]
It’s a drug- basically a “downer”. See definition below. By the way..say hello to my little friend..Quaa·lude (kwā’lūd’) pronunciationA trademark used for the drug methaqualone.WORD HISTORY The trademark Quaalude for the sedative and hypnotic agent methaqualone is an example of how a product name is carefully chosen for a positive public response. Methaqualone was developed in the 1960s by William H. Rorer, Inc. At that time, the company’s best-known product was Maalox, a digestive aid that derived its name from its ingredients, magnesium and aluminum hydroxides. To enhance the product recognition of their new sedative drug, the company incorporated the aa of Maalox into the name Quaalude. The other elements of the name are presumed to be a contraction of the phrase quiet interlude, a soothing, even poetic description of the drug’s effect.
a qualude was the ecstasy of the 70s. a “rorer 714” was a predominant drug in the club scene for “disco” people as well as rock and rollers.
a drug from the 80’s that made you like drunk
“Quaalude” is a brand name for Methaqualone, a sedative drug, similar in effect to a barbiturate. It was marketed as a sleeping pill in the ’60s, and as a sedative in the ’70s. It’s been used as a recreational as long as it’s been available. It’s an illegal drug. I can’t remember if they are uppers or downers tho.
Glutethimide (Doriden®) was introduced in 1954 and methaqualone (“Quaalude” Sopor®) in 1965 as safe barbiturate substitutes. Experience demonstrated, however; that their addiction liability and the severity of withdrawal symptoms were similar to those of barbiturates. By 1972, “luding out,” taking methaqualone with wine, was a popular college pastime. Excessive use leads to tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms similar to those of barbiturates. In the United States, the marketing of methaqualone pharmaceutical products stopped in 1984, and methaqualone was transferred to Schedule I of the CSA. In 1991, glutethimide was transferred into Schedule II in response to an upsurge in the prevalence of diversion, abuse, and overdose deaths. Today, there is little medical use of glutethimide in the United States.
The trademark Quaalude for the sedative and hypnotic agent methaqualone is an example of how a product name is carefully chosen for a positive public response. Methaqualone was developed in the 1960s by William H. Rorer, Inc. At that time, the company’s best-known product was Maalox, a digestive aid that derived its name from its ingredients, magnesium and aluminum hydroxides. To enhance the product recognition of their new sedative drug, the company incorporated the aa of Maalox into the name Quaalude. The other elements of the name are presumed to be a contraction of the phrase quiet interlude, a soothing, even poetic description of the drug’s effect.
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